Top Ten Authors I’ve Read The Most Books From

toptentuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and The Bookish!

So I haven’t done one of these in a LONG time, but since the theme worked so well into the direction I’m turning the blog in (i.e., promoting what I love, leaving the critical reviewing behind), I just had to do it. So, here we go (in no particular order)!

  1. Battle MagicTamora Pierce

This woman was the hero of my childhood. She was the hero of my tweens. She is the hero of my twenties. I got to learn from her for two summers in a row in high school–and THEN she came to my college freshman year–and the starry eyed wonder of her has never left me. Not to mention the fact that she has written more books than I actually know how to count and I have read them ALL.

2. Clive CusslerCrescent Dawn

There are about 20+ books in his Dirk Pitt series, PLUS however many are in the Kurt Austin adventures. He’s got a few other series now, but I’m a traditionalist and I’ve only ever read through these two favorites of mine.

3. All American GirlMeg Cabot

Didn’t every girl go through this phase? I’m not just talking Princess Diaries here, either. I read her stand-alones, her All-American Girl series … everything. If Meg Cabot write it, I had to have it.

4. Philippa GregoryChangeling

I will forever be cranky about the historical leaps that she took in The Other Boleyn Girl especially, but that doesn’t stop me from lapping up every single book she writes on Tudor England. I think the only books by her that I haven’t read was that one non-Royal series she did and–strangely–her YA series. The first book of which I have lying around here … somewhere.

bloodlines5. Richelle Mead

Richelle is another one of those authors that has written more books than I know how to count, but I haven’t actually read them ALL. I’m deeply obsessed with her 12 Vampire Academy and Bloodlines books but I have also read part of her Gameboard of the Gods series. I don’t know what I’ll do without more VA goodness, but she’s got me hooked enough on her to keep going with whatever she writes.

6. Cassandra Clareprincess

Did you guys miss the time that I drove 5 hours one way mostly to see Cassie? Because I did that. I have not only read everything she’s ever written, but also own it. (Except for that middle grade series she’s doing. I’m scared of middle grade.) She’s one of my favorite authors of all time right now, and I don’t see that changing in the foreseeable future.

A Countess Below Stairs7. Eva Ibbotson

Did anyone else read these books as a kid? I couldn’t stop. Sometime during my childhood, the publisher did a re-release of a bunch of her stuff and I bought all of it. It’s just so much … fun. Romantic, magical fun.

8. Simone ElkelesChain Reaction

I read Perfect Chemistry by Simone and I was just hooked. I went back and read all the stuff I’d missed beforehand, and then the two books that followed Perfect Chemistry. I even started her new series before my love of contemporary YA romance phased out. I still love these books to death, though.

Hex Hall9. Rachel Hawkins

Hex Hall was absolute perfection. When her Rebel Belle series started, I wasn’t so sure I could do it. But no. I’m in love with Rachel forever and always.

10. Kiersten WhiteThe Chaos of Stars

Sometimes I forget just how MUCH STUFF Kiersten has done. Her Paranormalcy series was beautiful, of course, but then there was her Egyptian God based book Chaos of Stars–which I just reread–and her Mind Games series. All of which I own, of course!

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Stacking the Shelves #3

Welcome to My Life is a Notebook’s 3rd Stacking the Shelves, as hosted by Tynga’s Reviews! I have 6 books to share with you guys this week, plus tons of insider information on two blog tours (with giveaways!) and an ARC I’ve already read…

Bought:

Possess by Gretchen McNeil – Goodreads

Changeling by Philippa Gregory – Goodreads

For Review:

What’s Left of Me by Kat Zhang – Goodreads

Mystic City by Theo Lawrence – Goodreads

Blog Tour:

Witchstruck by Victoria Lamb – Goodreads

Amateur Angel by Karri Thompson – Goodreads

Waiting on Wednesday #8

Waiting on Wednesday is a feature hosted by Breaking the Spine

Title: Changeling (The Order of Darkness #1)

Author: Philippa Gregory

Expected Publication Date: May 29, 2012

Blurb from Goodreads: Dark myths, medieval secrets, intrigue, and romance populate the pages of the first-ever teen series from #1 bestselling author of The Other Boleyn Girl Italy, 1453. Seventeen-year-old Luca Vero is brilliant, gorgeous—and accused of heresy. Cast out of his religious order for using the new science to question old superstitious beliefs, Luca is recruited into a secret sect: The Order of the Dragon, commissioned by Pope Nicholas V to investigate evil and danger in its many forms, and strange occurrences across Europe, in this year—the end of days.
Isolde is a seventeen-year-old girl shut up in a nunnery so she can’t inherit any of her father’s estate. As the nuns walk in their sleep and see strange visions, Isolde is accused of witchcraft—and Luca is sent to investigate her, but finds himself plotting her escape.
Despite their vows, despite themselves, love grows between Luca and Isolde as they travel across Europe with their faithful companions, Freize and Ishraq. The four young people encounter werewolves, alchemists, witches, and death-dancers as they head toward a real-life historical figure who holds the boundaries of Christendom and the secrets of the Order of the Dragon.
The first in a series, this epic and richly detailed drama is grounded in historical communities and their mythic beliefs. It includes a medieval map of Europe that will track their journey; and the interior will include relevant decorative elements as well as an interior line illustration. And look for a QR code that links to a note from the author with additional, detailed information about the setting and the history that informed the writing. With Philippa Gregory’s trademark touch, this novel deftly brings the past—and its salacious scandals—vividly and disturbingly to life.

Why I’m Waiting: I’ll admit, Gregory’s books have always gone sharply either way with me. But DID YOU READ THAT BLURB? DID YOU? There are so many things RIGHT with this book that I’m drooling. All my favorite genres just got rolled up into one beautiful package and handed to me on a silver platter. Gregory has done some fantastic things with historical fiction, and I’m really interested to see how she’ll handle something paranormal along with the history. Once again, I’m sure this can go either way with me, but for now I’M EXCITED. (Plus, the cover looks pretty spectacular, don’t you think?)

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Historical Fiction Books

Over at the lovely The Broke and the Bookish blog, they run a feature called “Top Ten Tuesday.” Because I have been meaning to get in on this for AGES, I finally managed to set down and get myself to DO it. I decided to take the prompt and do my Top Ten Historical Fiction books, because I just recently found myself back on this kick. It should be noted that I read mostly Egyptian and Tudor England books, hence the lack of variety on the list. 😛 (All links will go to the book’s Goodreads page so you can read more about them.)

1. The Heretic Queen by Michelle Moran

If you enjoy Egyptian historical fiction and have NOT read this book, there is something seriously wrong with you. Not kidding. This one deals with Nefertari, the beloved queen of Ramses the Great. It also postulates a few things that could have been possible to make the history more interesting, which will only make sense to you if you read…

2. Nefertiti by Michelle Moran

Self explanatory as to which Pharaoh and Queen this one deals with. This was Moran’s first book, and the one that really got me interested in the Armana period in the first place. Gorgeously done, as always.

3. The Queen’s Governess by Karen Harper

I’ll admit, I was tentative about going into a book narrated by Queen Elizabeth’s governess Kat Ashley, but this was a surprise find I was very happy with.

4. Cleopatra’s Daughter by Michelle Moran

Okay, yeah, I kind of hero-worship Moran. This one was her last Egyptian novel in a while, sadly, but it opened my eyes to a whole new story I had never realized existed: the story of Cleopatra’s daughter, Cleopatra Selene, and the rest of Cleopatra’s kids. I don’t know why this was a group of figures I never looked into before, because these poor kids were the only people left to deal with the fallout of their parents death and the Roman’s anger. Seriously. Read it.

5. The King’s Rose by Alisa M. Libby

I had never really been a fan of Catherine Howard, and in fact she was my least favorite of Henry VIII’s 6 wives. However, this book was done really well, and I actually started connecting with her. As always–and probably truthfully–she is depicted as vain and vapid, but she had other characteristics in this book that make her into a real, young girl who was placed in a powerful, dangerous situation.

6. Mistress of Rome by Kate Quinn

To this day, I have no idea why I picked up this book, since I usually avoid Roman history, but I’m glad I did. Not only was this a different kind of story, but it was also a historical with a real STORY hidden beneath all the layers. Some historicals read like a history book, especially when dealing with well written characters, so this was a refreshing read with a new story for me.

7. The Red Queen’s Daughter by Jaqueline Kolosov

Mostly recommended for young readers, this was another story I had never thought to look into. Catherine Parr’s young daughter with Thomas Seymour is thought to have died around the age of three or so, but this imagines what if she didn’t. PLUS, it adds in some elements of witchcraft and magic, which was equally awesome.

8. Cleopatra’s Moon by Vicky Alvear Shecter (this link goes to my review)

This is another retelling of the story of Cleopatra’s daughter Cleopatra Selene, which I found to be quite different from Moran’s version. This version of Selene is even more kick butt, and–since the facts surrounding her and her brothers are so few–Shecter was able to imagine a whole new story plotline that was engaging even though I’d read Cleopatra’s Daughter before.

9. Innocent Traitor by Alison Weir

I’ve never been a fan of Weir’s writing style for the most part, or really cared about Jane Grey, but this book just had me feeling everything for the “Nine Day Queen.” I had never really thought about what she thought, or what she went through, but this book really connected me.

10. The Queen’s Fool by Philippa Gregory

I’m usually a sucker for Gregory’s books, but the Queen’s Fool is definitely one of my favorites. Few people are ever really sympathetic to Mary Tudor, so I found that really interesting. Also, usually Gregory goes from the point of view of a well-known historical figure, but this time she uses the POV of a made up girl with the power of Sight (seeing the future) which made it doubly interesting. Gregory connected the story to Mary and Elizabeth, but also let the main character tell her own.

So now you know MY top 10 – what are yours, and do you have any recommendations for me?