Perusing Poetics: End of the Poetics Journey

I started out this blog talking about the two different parts of me, and how they work together. I’m going to end it by talking about how they stand apart. Granted, I’m going to be focusing more on my Writing major, just because the Poetics is a Writing Department class, but trust me when I say that the point I’m about to make is applicable to my English major too.

Yes, this post is required as a final project. Yes, there are question guidelines. I’m about to do a very odd thing and copy them out for you (sorry Professor. I swear there’s a reason for this):

  1. What do you make and is it similar in any way to the art practices we’ve read and/or talked about in class?
  2. Why do you make it, and do you see your ideas aligning with or being similar to the “why” of anyone we have read and/or talked about in class?
  3. What is the relationship of language to what you make, and is this relationship in any way similar to anyone we have read and/or talked about in class?

Using your digital archive and ideas, address

  1. What are your influences and how have they influenced what you have made up to this point? Who or what do you admire in your field, and why? (Use videos, images, other archives, etc.)
  2. What do you aspire to create, and what have you learned or encountered in class (if anything) that may affect your processes going forward? (Note: this can be a negative effect. That is, “Now that I’ve seen how horribly wrong thing XYZ can go, I want to avoid that route…)
  3. What was the most influential/important reading and/or concept to your own processes of making?

You know what I’m absolutely sick of? Realizing there are two ways I want to answer these questions. Then realizing that one of them is just another story I’m afraid to tell.

“What I mean is that within the University there could exist a relationship with word, language, thought, tradition, and power that might run counter to the relationship a poet might want to have with word, language, thought, tradition and power.” – Sarah Vap, End of The Sentimental Journey

Recently, in my Renaissance Literature class, the professor asked us what we were going to be reading over the summer. My answer would have been Sarah J. Maas’s A Court of Thorns and Roses. But I didn’t answer, because people starting saying “Milton” or “Absalom, Absalom.” My answer didn’t seem like it fit.

So, today, when I answer these questions, I’m not going to do any of us the disservice of lying or telling you half-truths. I’m going to tell you BOTH truths. I’m going to answer you from the

Academic

and from the

Personal

Bear with me.

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Top Ten Books That I Wish Were Taught In Schools

toptentuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish!

Hey, Gretchen here, and I have a confession. Due to the unconventional nature of my high school experience, I have no freaking idea what is actually on a general required reading list for anyone. So I decided to do the secondary topic this week, Top Ten Books That I Wish Were Taught in Schools. Again, I have absolutely no idea what SHOULD be on this list, so I came up with a bunch of my own for my own reasons. Cool? Cool. Here they are, in no particular order.

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Top Ten Most Intimidating Books

toptentuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish!

Okay, this is going to be the loosest use of the definition of “intimidating” in all of time and space. I taught myself to read at 3 and read and can read 700 page books in a disturbingly short period of time, so “intimidating” isn’t usually what I apply to books–I tend to look at challenging books as a challenge of how long it’ll take me to finish them. But anyways. Here we go (in no particular order)!

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Bibliomancy for Beginners: Hangout Video for “Tree of Codes” by Jonathan Safran Foer

Hey guys! It’s that time again! This week on Bibliomancy for Beginners, we’re talking Jonathan Safran Foer’s Tree of Codes. I didn’t write up a review this time, so I’ll let the video say it all! Join us back here next week when we read Wards of Faerie by Terry Brooks!

Tree of CodesTree of Codes by Jonathan Safran Foer

Goodreads | Amazon

3 stars from me

Tree of Codes is a haunting new story by best-selling American writer, Jonathan Safran Foer. With a different die-cut on every page, Tree of Codes explores previously unchartered literary territory. Initially deemed impossible to make, the book is a first — as much a sculptural object as it is a work of masterful storytelling. Tree of Codes is the story of an enormous last day of life — as one character’s life is chased to extinction, Foer multi-layers the story with immense, anxious, at times disorientating imagery, crossing both a sense of time and place, making the story of one person’s last day everyone’s story. Inspired to exhume a new story from an existing text, Jonathan Safran Foer has taken his “favorite” book, The Street of Crocodiles by Polish-Jewish writer Bruno Schulz, and used it as a canvas, cutting into and out of the pages, to arrive at an original new story told in Jonathan Safran Foer’s own acclaimed voice.

Bibliomancy for Beginners Google+ Hangout for “Magic for Beginners” by Kelly Link happens TONIGHT!

Link_cover.inddCheck back here at 8:30 PM EST for Bibliomancy for Beginners live hangout for Magic for Beginners by Kelly Link!

I don’t know if you’ve been following my Goodreads/Twitter but … it’s going to be an interesting hangout. I ended up giving this one a rating of two stars on Goodreads, while Michaela from The Pied Piper Calls gave it four. Where do Taylor and Rachel fall? Watch the video to find out!

Short stories not your thing? Check back next week for our hangout video for Tree of Codes by Jonathan Safran Froer! If you get a chance to look at this book, DO IT, because the pages are all cut out and it’s really crazy just to look at. It’ll be one heck of a hangout! (Also, next Tuesday is my birthday. So there is that.)

At 8:30 PM, this post will be updated with the live link to the hangout!

Weekly Wrap-Up + Stacking the Shelves #13

wrapup

I don’t know if this is for myself or you guys, but I’m going to start doing weekly wrap up posts along with my Stacking the Shelves videos. So if you want to watch the video…go! If you don’t, here’s a summary of what’s happening:

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Top Ten Books on My Have-But-Need-To-Read List

toptentuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish!

This week’s topic is a TTT Freebie, so I decided to give you guys a taste of what’s coming up on the blog! These are the next ten books I’ll be reviewing – roughly. I’m trying to make it through the pile of ARCs I’m behind on, but there’s no telling when a book I have on my actual shelf will call me and then I’ll derail and read that one. But this should give you a general idea!

The Boyfriend App1. The Boyfriend App by Katie Sise

I’m not sure why I requested this contemporary romance, but it sounds interesting so what the heck? If my calendar goes as expected, this review will be up May 30.

2. Going Vintage by Lindsey LeavittGoing Vintage

I’m excited about this book for multiple reasons. I’ve been tracking it ever since I found it, and Bloomsbury was nice enough to give me and eARC. This review should be up May 31st.

Criminal3. Criminal by Terra Elan McVoy

This book seems darker than the stuff I usually read, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing! It’ll be interesting to see how my stomach takes this. 😛 This review should be up June 3rd.

4. City of a Thousand Dolls by Miriam ForsterCity of a Thousand Dolls

This actually isn’t an ARC, but rather the next book my book club is doing – it’s my pick, if you couldn’t tell by the ya-ness of it all. I’m really excited for this one. Hopefully it’s going to be good! This review should be up, with the hangout video, on June 5th.

Reboot5. Reboot by Amy Tintera

I don’t know if the people who did the covers for Criminal and Reboot know each other, but I’m loving the minimalist colors on black that’s going on. Can’t wait to read this one, with the review going up June 6th.

6. Born of Illusion by Teri BrownBorn of Illusion

A book set in 1920s  New York, all about magicians and mediums? This book promises to be interesting if nothing else! Look for this review about June 7th.

Gameboard of the Gods7. Gameboard of the Gods by Richelle Mead

Alright, technically this isn’t a young adult, but it’s RICHELLE MEAD. When it popped up I HAD to request an ARC and then I got it and I’m so happy. Look for this review about June 10th.

8. Transparent by Natalie WhippleTransparent

This is a story about an invisible girl. I was sold before I had to read any more of the blurb. This review should be up about June 13th.

Dare to u9. Dare to You by Katie McGarry

If you read my review of Pushing the Limits, then you know that I have a shameless LOVELOVELOVE for that book. I got an ARC of this one, and I’m crossing my fingers its as good as the first! Look for this review June 14th.

10. Tree of Codes by Jonathan Safran FoerTree of Codes

This is likely to be the craziest book I have ever read. It’s for book club, and it’s one of those post modernist texts that are just cuckoo for cocoa puffs. The pages are all cut funny and … man, this is going to be one hangout you won’t want to miss. See the review and video  June 19th.